Companies are rushing to adopt facial recognition technology, raising concerns that the law is overdue

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  • The introduction of facial recognition technology to all pubs and clubs in New South Wales shows the economy is pushing for biometrics collection before the law catches up, experts warn.

The NSW government introduced new legislation this week allowing the use of facial recognition in pubs and clubs, but no rules have yet been drawn up for its implementation.

the scheme, which is already in use at around 100 licensed venues, aims to combat problem gambling by matching people’s images with those who have participated in the industry’s self-exclusion scheme. will be used. Lobby Group said photos of other people at the venue will be removed.

A spokesperson said the system is “compliant” with data protection laws and Australian privacy principles, and “strong safeguards are built in against the use and disclosure of biometric data.” As the Australian Information Commissioner’s (OAIC) ​​Commonwealth Office implements data protection legislation, experts say the growing use of facial recognition technology in Australia is of ‘extreme concern’ and current legislation will address it.

“At the moment, we don’t have all the uniform standards for deployment. For example, we have no idea who operates this system or how its usage limits are regulated.”

“But there are loopholes in data protection laws big enough to drive a truck,” said Nick Davis, a professor of emerging technologies at the University of Technology Sydney.

Department of Spirits and Gambling Secretary Kevin Anderson told Congress that the use of the technology will be regulated by the OAIC and that there will be a set of rules that guide its use, including “signatures, purposes of data collection, retention periods and other privacy-preserving mechanisms.”

However, these regulations still need to be created, which she identified as a key issue Kate Bower, a consumer data advocate for Choice. “The current problem is the increasing use of facial recognition technology.

“Use is determined on a case-by-case basis. Companies, not people, should determine appropriate uses.” Earlier this year, retailers Bannings and her Kmart announced they would stop using facial recognition technology in stores after a Choice investigation found companies were using it for “security and anti-theft.”

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